War is a racket

In a book he wrote called “War is A Racket”, this is what a former Marine Major General had to say about the nature of the war:

I suspected I was just part of a racket at the time. Now I am sure of it. Like all the members of the military profession, I never had a thought of my own until I left the service. My mental faculties remained in suspended animation while I obeyed the orders of higher-ups. This is typical with everyone in the military service.

I helped make Mexico, especially Tampico, safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefits of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912 (where have I heard that name before?). I brought light to the Dominican Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. In China I helped to see to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested.

People around the world have seen US military dominance as a racket for as long as it has operated abroad, but this is a high ranking official who blindly served America.  The whole “we’re not tools of the government, or anyone else” speech comes to mind…

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/excerpt-from-marines-speech-proves-little-has-changed-in-80-years-2013-7#ixzz2azY67Ku8

Declaration of War: Sexism And Why We Need Vigilante Justice

< Sept 18: This is an old post that seemed relevant to me again. Enjoy. >

Declaration of War

This may or may not be a satire.

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MGS4: Sold Out Part 2: War is Routine

(This article has been updated on May 31, 2011 for your enjoyment)

PART 2: War is Routine

Old Snake: War has changed. It’s no longer about nations, ideologies, or ethnicity. It’s an endless series of proxy battles fought by mercenaries and machines. War – and its consumption of life – has become a well-oiled machine.

Obvious Reason

When the first game trailers were being shown, it was a shock for many to see that the setting of Metal Gear Solid 4 was the Middle East, and more shocking yet to hear the commentary of Snake about war being “routine”. What could such a thing mean? It wasn’t the same stylish, “cool” Metal Gear world we had seen before: it was desolation and massacre for no good reason. For literally the first time ever, there was no enemy stronghold to infiltrate, no big scary dude with a Metal Gear threatening the world. Indeed, we were sneaking into an actual battlefield, a neutral agent passing through somebody else’s pointless war. Why would Kojima break his successful formula for something as bleak and complex as that?

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