Will the Metal Gear Solid movie utilize VR simulation plot device to jump between missions?

Metal Gear Solid movie director Vogt-Roberts recently did an interview with Eurogamer in which he made some extremely interesting statements.

This only leaves me with a single conclusion: the movie will utilize Virtual Reality simulations to explain how Raiden/Jack can jump in between missions that are decades apart and carried out by different men. By becoming Solid Snake and Big Boss in lifelike VR scenarios, Raiden would be able to conduct research, train himself, and probably solve some kind of problem related to the Patriots. There’s no other Metal Gear plot device that could “fuse” the different game stories together. Judging by how much Vogt-Roberts is pushing for a wacky, “post-Deadpool” style of film that will betray audiences and commit to weirdness… this is looking extremely plausible.

Vogt-Roberts says that Metal Gear shaped his creativity in some ways, and that the weirdness of it was essential to his enjoyment. He wants to carry on the tradition of embracing controversial visions, and the VR plot gimmick is one of the only things in the history of the series that could truly polarize the fanbase. Some people would love it, others would hate it. Raiden is the fulcrum point of the whole series, and the only one who was in a position to jump back and forth between missions that he never actually experienced.

For myself (the guy who spread the “VR Theory” in the first place) the prospect of seeing the first major Metal Gear film subvert the reality of the missions like this would be hilarious.

BOOK UPDATE

Thank you to my readers for supporting me the whole way through the writing process of the book. It’s been a very tough and exciting process. Check out the below video to see me talk about how it feels now that the book is finished and in the hands of the publishing company.

 

Another interview with OJA, this time on MGS4

This was a fun discussion of Metal Gear Solid 4 and the legacy it has today. OJA and I agreed to do a podcast about MGS4 some time in the future, and the release of the “In Defense of MGS4” video I posted a link to recently sparked the timing to come back and have a chat. A lot of things about MGS4 have been forgotten since the game was released, and I wanted to remind people about what made the game’s release complicated.

It’s a pretty casual conversation, we didn’t do a bunch of research or preparation before getting into the talk. Check it out:

Defense of MGS4 video

Here’s a new video defending MGS4 as a wonderfully caring sequel that’s full of love, not a jaded attack on nostalgia. The argument revolves around the production values, detail, and care put into the game itself, and accepts the harsh world and themes as being some kind of natural, logical “price to pay” for fans demanding more sequels in a series that should have ended.

Check it out and see if you agree with his point of view.

 

Pokemon Go event has people hunting for connections, not monsters

I normally wouldn’t feel bad for people who go to major events and experiencing technical issues, but I really appreciate the report given by Eurogamer of the Pokemon Go Fest held by Niantic. It’s dumbfounding how a game event entirely revolving around massive simultaneous connections to game servers could be unprepared, but we see it all the time. People come to the event excited to try out the new features and celebrate a strangely wholesome video game in public, and this is what happens.